Category: Nationalism

A Jewish settler walks past Israeli settlement construction sites in the Israeli-occupied West Bank near Jerusalem on June 30. (Ammar Awad/Reuters)

Whatever Israel decides, a one-state reality looms

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and his new coalition government may not roll the dice this week. The international community has counted the days to July 1 with a degree of dread, wary of Netanyahu following through on his vows to annex parts of Palestinian territory where Jewish settlements sit. But, at the time of this writing, it was not […]

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Highlights of the 19th China Beijing International High-tech Expo (Images Chinadaily.com.cn)

Understanding China’s 2025 Ambitions

China is on a multi-year mission to reduce its reliance on foreign technology and as a result, Beijing is investing heavily in its own technological developments. Premier Li Keqiang announced the Made in China 2025 (MIC 2025) initiative in 2015 as a bid to significantly advance the country’s economy and industrial base with a goal of achieving manufacturing dominance by […]

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An early celebration of Emancipation Day (Juneteenth) in 1900 (Austin History Center, Austin Public Library)

Juneteenth: An American Celebration

The First Juneteenth “The people of Texas are informed that, in accordance with a proclamation from the Executive of the United States, all slaves are free. This involves an absolute equality of personal rights and rights of property between former masters and slaves, and the connection heretofore existing between them becomes that between employer and hired labor. The freedmen are […]

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Memorial Day 2020

Memorial Day 2020

Trace Adkins Performs “Still a Soldier” on the 2020 National Memorial Day Concert As all 50 states in the US begin lifting restrictions put in place to combat the coronavirus outbreak, the CDC still recommends people to: Social distance Wear a face mask in public Perform hand hygiene Clean and disinfect frequently touched surfaces Read the Travelers Considerations on the […]

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How America Invented the Celts (image Pixabay)

How America Invented the Celts

March has arrived, and with it, St. Patrick’s Day—patronal feast of the Emerald Isle. But two of the other five Celtic peoples have their patron’s days in March as well. Wales’s St. David opens the month on the first, and Cornwall’s St. Piran rolls along four days later. Of course, the Bretons and Manx celebrate in later months while the […]

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The True Meaning of Freedom

The True Meaning of Freedom

We may not have free will, but we can still act freely—sort of. America is a symbol of freedom all over the world, enjoying as it does freedom of speech, freedom of religion, and freedom of the press. Our ancestors prized these political freedoms so much that many of them were willing to die defending them. And though many of […]

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The Third Crusade (Image Album on Imgur)

Our Christian Heritage

Sailing for King Ferdinand and Queen Isabella of Spain, Christopher Columbus reached America in the Bahamas on Friday, October 12, 1492. Columbus and his men knelt down and gave thanks to God for their safe voyage and claimed the island a Spanish possession. He christened the island San Salvador – Holy Savior. Curious and friendly natives came out to meet […]

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Maryland: First Mass, 1634. (Photograph by Granger)

Maryland

Maryland was one of four of the original 13 English colonies that was specifically chartered for religious freedom, as a refuge from religious persecution. Maryland was the primary entry point for Catholics in the English colonies. Lord Baltimore George Calvert was secretary of state for King James I and converted to Catholicism in 1625. He resigned upon succession by the […]

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The Pilgrims of Plymouth Colony, Massachusetts

The Pilgrims of Plymouth Colony, Massachusetts

On November 9, 1620, the Mayflower, carrying 102 passengers with 50 Pilgrims aboard in search of religious freedom, approached Cape Cod, Massachusetts, having left England 65 days earlier on September 6, 1620. The Pilgrims were Separatist Protestants who made a clean break with the Anglican Church of England during the reign of King James I. A small community in Scrooby, […]

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A Colombian anti-drugs police officer arranges packages of cocaine to be shown to the press on May 29, 2013, in Cali, department of Valle del Cauca, Colombia. Anti-narcotics unit of the National Police seized 1,4 tons of cocaine during an operation called "Republic 41". Authorities said the drug would be sent to Guatemala and belonged to the criminal gang "Los Rastrojos". AFP PHOTO/Luis ROBAYO (Photo credit should read LUIS ROBAYO/AFP/Getty Images)

The Case for Just War on Narcoterrorism

The constant infiltration of illicit drugs from south of the border and the devastation it has wrought on American cities and sizable portions of the population do not seem to have been enough for the U.S. to move against the drug cartels. However, the shocking, brutal massacre by cartel thugs some days ago of the group of American Mormons—all of […]

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